ARTIBEUS JAMAICENSIS PDF

June 20, 2020 0 Comments

() examined the phylogenetics and phylogeography of the Jamaican fruit- eating bat (Artibeus jamaicensis). Results document that A. jamaicensis (sensu. Learn more about the Jamaican fruit-eating bat – with amazing Jamaican fruit- eating bat videos, photos and facts on Arkive. August, P. V. Acoustical properties of the distress calls of Artibeus jamaicensis and Phyllostomus hastatus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae). The Southwestern.

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Share this image — Hide sharing options. Named for the island from which it was first described 2 3the Jamaican fruit-eating bat is a relatively large, thickset bat with short, velvety fur, broad wings and no external tail 2 3 4 5. The head is large, with large eyes, while the ears are pointed, triangular and quite widely separated, and there is a well-developed noseleaf 2 3 4. The fur of the Jamaican fruit-eating bat is dark brown, greyish or black on the upperparts, and the individual hairs have white bases, giving a slightly silvery tinge.

The underparts are usually paler, and the wings and narrow, naked tail membrane are black or brown.

The face usually bears four pale stripes, both above and below the eyes, although these may sometimes be faint 2 3 4 5 6. The Jamaican fruit-eating bat shows considerable variation in size across it wide range, and a number of subspecies have been recognised 2 3 6 7. However, there is disagreement over whether one of these, Artibeus jamaicensis planirostrisrepresents a distinct species 1 2 7.

As its name suggests, the Jamaican fruit-eating bat feeds mainly on fruit, particularly figs Ficus speciesalthough some pollen, nectar, flowers, leaves and insects are also taken 2 3 4 5 8. Fruits are not consumed in the fruiting tree itself, but are instead carried to a nearby feeding roost 2 3 5 8where the fruit is chewed and the juices swallowed, while any fibrous material is spat out in the form of a chewed pellet 3. The Jamaican fruit-eating bat has a unique breeding pattern, closely tied to seasonal peaks in food abundance 8.

In some locations, the species may breed year-round, but in other areas the female usually gives birth twice a year, to a single young at a time, with the births coinciding with periods of peak food availability usually at the end of the wet season. Although the usual gestation period is 3. The female mates again soon after giving birth 2 3 5 8.

The young bats start to fly at around 31 to 51 days old, and reach adult size after about 80 days. Sexual maturity is reached at 8 to 12 months 2 5and this species may live for up to 9 years in the wild 2 3. These harems usually roost in tree hollows, or close together in caves, and the male spends much of its time close to the roost site, keeping away rivals.

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However, these groups are less stable than the harems and often shift roosting site 8 Juveniles of both sexes leave the harem group before reaching adulthood 2 5 8. It also occurs in the Caribbean, including the Greater and Lesser Antilles and the southern Bahamas, and in the lower Florida Keys 1 2 3 5 6.

This species occurs in a range of habitats, including tropical evergreen forestseasonal dry forest, cloud forestand even human-modified habitats such as gardens and plantations 2 4 6. The Jamaican fruit-eating bat has been recorded at elevations up to around 2, metres 2 6.

The Jamaican fruit-eating bat is an abundant and widespread species and is not currently considered at risk of extinction 1. No major threats have been identified, although the species is considered destructive to cultivated fruit crops in some areas, and measures are sometimes taken to control it 2 5. There are not known to jamqicensis any specific conservation measures currently in place for this common bat.

However, it is reported to occur in a number of protected areas throughout its range 1artiveus may give its populations some measure of protection. This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be jamaiensis as soon as possible. If you are able to help please contact: Embed this Arkive thumbnail link “portlet” by copying and pasting the code below. Terms of Use – The displayed portlet may be used as a link from your website to Arkive’s online content for private, scientific, conservation or educational purposes only.

It may NOT be used within Apps. MyARKive offers the scrapbook feature to signed-up members, allowing you to organize your favourite Arkive images and videos and share them with friends. Team WILD, an elite squadron of science superheroes, needs your help! Which species are on the road to recovery? Help us share the wonders of the natural world. Rodents of Unusual Size.

Wildscreen With – Tom Hooker: Lindsey Paretti – Blood Island. AfricachimpanzeeconservationfilmIn the Fieldlab chimpsLiberiaPrimatesprimatologyrehabilitationtrue storywildlifewildlife filmWildscreen Festival. Share on Facebook Tweet Send email. Jamaican fruit-eating bat Artibeus jamaicensis.

Jamaican fruit-eating bat fact file Description Biology Range Habitat Status Threats Conservation Find out more Glossary References Print factsheet Jamaican fruit-eating bat description Kingdom Animalia Phylum Chordata Class Mammalia Order Chiroptera Family Phyllostomidae Genus Artibeus 1 Named for the island from which it was first described 2 3the Jamaican fruit-eating bat is a relatively large, thickset bat with short, velvety fur, broad wings and no external tail 2 3 4 5.

Also known as common fruit bat, Jamaican fruit bat, Mexican fruit bat. Cuban fig-eating bat Phyllops falcatus.

Banana bat Musonycteris harrisoni. Western nectar bat Lonchophylla hesperia. Jamaican fruit-eating bat biology As its name suggests, the Jamaican fruit-eating bat feeds mainly on fruit, particularly figs Ficus speciesalthough some pollen, nectar, flowers, leaves and insects are also taken 2 3 4 5 8. White marlin Kajikia albida.

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Albacore tuna Thunnus alalunga. Jamaican fruit-eating bat habitat This species occurs in a range of habitats, including tropical evergreen forestseasonal dry forest, cloud forestand even human-modified habitats such as uamaicensis and plantations 2 4 6. Artibesu myotis Myotis nigricans. Blue lorikeet Vini peruviana. Iris lorikeet Psitteuteles iris. Jamaican fruit-eating bat threats The Jamaican fruit-eating bat is jamaicenzis abundant and widespread species and is not currently considered at risk of artibsus 1.

Jamaican fruit-eating bat conservation There are not known to be any specific conservation measures currently in place for this common bat. Find out more For more information on bat conservation see: Authentication This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be updated as soon as possible.

Glossary Cloud forest A tropical mountain forest, with a high incidence of cloud cover throughout the year.

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

Evergreen forest Forest consisting mainly of evergreen trees, which retain leaves all year round. This is in contrast to deciduous trees, which completely lose their jamaicensos for part of the year. Gestation The state of being pregnant; the period from conception to birth. Noseleaf A fleshy structure surrounding the nose, common to many bats. It is believed to function in focusing echolocation calls high-pitched calls used in orientation and to locate prey emitted from the nose.

Subspecies A population usually restricted to a geographical area that differs from other populations of the same species, but not to the extent of being classified as a separate species. Mammalian Species University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil. A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference. Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, Number Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D. Artibeua59 4: Journal of Mammalogy80 4: X Close Image credit.

Artibeus jamaicensis

Jamaicensie Close Link to this photo Embed this Arkive jamaicsnsis link “portlet” by copying and pasting the code below. This species is featured in: Please donate to Arkive Help us share the wonders of the natural world.

Sign up to our newsletter Get the latest wild news direct to your inbox. Blog Friday 05 October Wildscreen With: Rodents of Unusual Size communitycoypudocumentaryecosystemenvironmentfilmmakerfilmmaking jamaicnsis, invasiveinvasive speciesrodentsUSAWetlandswildlife Monday 24 September Wildscreen With – Tom Hooker: Lindsey Paretti – Blood Island AfricachimpanzeeconservationfilmIn the Fieldlab chimpsLiberiaPrimatesprimatologyrehabilitationtrue storywildlifewildlife filmWildscreen Festival.