BEYAZ KALE ORHAN PAMUK PDF

June 20, 2020 0 Comments

The White Castle has ratings and reviews. Ahmad said: Beyaz Kale = The white castle: a novel, Orhan Pamukعنوانها: دژ سفید؛ قلعه سفید؛ نویسنده. Buy a cheap copy of Beyaz Kale book by Orhan Pamuk. Orhan Pamuk proffers a dazzling work of historical and philosophical fiction, set amid the scholarship. Beyaz Kale by Orhan Pamuk, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See kqle Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The White Castle by Orhan Pamuk. Victoria Rowe Holbrook Translator. From a Turkish writer who has been compared with Borges, Nabokov, and DeLillo comes a dazzling novel that is at once a captivating work of historical fiction and a sinuous treatise on the enigma of identity and the relations between East and West.

In the 17th century, a young Italian scholar sailing from Venice to Naples is taken prisoner and delivered to Constantinople.

T From a Turkish writer who has been compared with Borges, Nabokov, and DeLillo comes a dazzling novel beysz is at once a captivating work of historical fiction and a sinuous treatise on the enigma of identity and the relations between East and West. There he falls into the custody of a scholar known as Hoja–“master”–a man who is oryan exact double.

In the years that follow, the slave instructs his master in Western science and technology, from medicine to pyrotechnics. But Hoja wants to know more: Set in a world of magnificent scholarship and terrifying savagery, The White Castle is a colorful and intricately patterned triumph of the imagination. Paperbackpages. Published July 26th by Faber and Faber first published Independent Foreign Fiction Prize To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about The White Castleplease sign up. Lists with This Book. View all 4 comments. Feb 22, Ian “Marvin” Graye rated it it was amazing Shelves: A Short Start I started reading this novel, because it was Pamuk’s shortest and although I liked the subject matter of his other novels, I was worried I might bite off more than I could chew I am the sort of person who must finish a book once I’ve started it, even if I hate it.

So this was a taster for me. From A to B Inevitably I think it is fair to say that what happens at the end is inevitable. His craftsmanship lies in how he achieves it. There is a moment towards the end of the book when th A Short Start I started reading this novel, because it was Pamuk’s shortest and although I liked the subject matter of his other novels, I was worried I might bite off more than I could chew I am the sort of person who must finish a book once I’ve started it, even if I hate it.

There is a moment towards the end of the book when the door opens and we’re suddenly on the other side of the story.

Only we have to look back over our shoulder and think, how did I get here? From A to B Predictably It annoys me when people criticise a book, because they think it is predictable. Everything is predictable to someone, if not necessarily me, because I didn’t see it coming.

BEYAZ KALE

I am not a big fan of prediction. I don’t see the point. From A to B Enjoyably But even if it is predictable, the skill is in the journey, the telling.

It’s like a joke, or life or sex, we all know what the end is, it’s what happens between now and then that matters. Something similar might have happened to us all, it’s the little differences that matter.

View all 5 comments. Aug 10, Paola rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a novel on identity: Is the Italian slave really taking the place of his “hoja” i. Or is this really a fantasy in itself, of the Turk, the Hoja, so disappointed with his fellow Turks, so disgusted with their intellectual inferiority, with their passiveness, with their lack of imagination, so much craving for the intellectually stimulating life that he can just barely perceive through the bearing, knowledge and stories of his learned slave, that he decides to live this swapped fantasy himself, willing himself to believe that he is no longer the Hoja, but the Italian former slave?

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The conclusion I want to believe is the latter – it is the Italian that really flees the siege of the White Castle, and who knows whether he ever reached his native land – and maybe good for him if he did not, what could have come out of such an impossible readjustment?

Or maybe, it is Hoja himself who killed him on that fateful night, with such quintessentially unreliable narrator we will never really know.

But I like to think that having finally reached that zenith he had been aspiring too for so many years, accepting the inevitable debacle was too much to bear, and finding comfort in living a dream nobody could take away from him almost unescapable.

View all 6 comments. View all 3 comments. This book starts with a foreword from a made-up finder who found the story in an archive – and who gives the book its ‘dedication to-‘ I kind of like books that start like this.

Anyway, the story seems to be partly fact, partly fiction, a story of s Istanbul where two similar-looking men form a strange friendship. The author is the one half of this, remaining nameless throughout, an Italian who was captured and sold to slavery by pirates, finally owned by Hoca a title, no real name fo This book starts with a foreword from a made-up finder who found the story in an archive – and who gives the book its ‘dedication to-‘ The author is the one half of this, remaining nameless throughout, an Italian who was captured and sold to slavery by pirates, finally owned by Hoca a title, no real name for him is given, eitheran ‘insufferable genius’ with constantly-changing temper and high opinion of himself; the writer is more like opposite: A bond forms, firstly in that they learn from each other, not just knowledge, but of their lives, though Hoca keeps the information of the latter more secret.

Helping each other, they finally gain the attention and trust of the young sultan we follow the story from sultan’s late childhood on, to youth, to manhoodthrough stories, interesting books, guessing the future cleverly, and finally by a promise for a great weapon for battle. Like the writer, we can wonder about why Hoca is like he is, why he needs the division between himself and ‘them’, why he fears vulnerability, the reason for his temper?

There is the question about identity: The book has a plot, but I feel it’s more of a musing-piece on indentity, on belonging, on ‘what is genius?

Yet I feel it’s a book I want to reread, and I feel it was good to start reading the author from here; well worth it.

I’m sure it deserves more than 3 stars cause it’s a unique and one of a kind story but I haven’t enjoyed it that much The ending was vague as were the characters sometimes I thought the character Hoja was mentally disturbed and sometimes I thought he was a genius. The Master and his Slave look exactly alike!

Beyaz Kale kesinlikle bu romanlardan biri. View all 7 comments. Sep 04, Ksenia rated it liked it Shelves: But I don’t see The White Castle as a triumph. It’s good but nothing more. Pamuk tells us a story about a slave who inspite all diffuculties and troubles took his place in the turkish society of masters and a master who seemed to be insane and genious at the same time.

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They are similar like brothers and their mind had become similar, too. Knowledge of the Slave became a part of Hoja. Hoj “The White Castle is a colorful and intricately patterned triumph of the imagination.

Hoja’s enthusiasm became a part of the Slave. Not only readers but also they could hardly say where he ended and where started another one.

The main idea is that human heart has no limits. People can sacrifice themselves to save another human being. The fact that Hoja and the narrator exchanged their lives proves that.

White Castle (Beyaz Kale)/Orhan Pamuk

View all 14 comments. Well, all those words of Turkish origin that we have in Romanian helped a lot, as well. So in order to feed my recent interest in Turkish culture, I think my next Pamuk will be something quite different. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It is almost impossible to talk about this book without revealing its ending or at least what one might consider to be its ending.

This strange work purports to be a 17th century manuscript found by one Faruk Darvinoglu in We find that in the manuscript we are about to read, ‘ On page 3 Faruk reveals that a professor he had consu It is almost impossible to talk about this book without revealing its ending or at least what one might consider to be its ending. On page 3 Faruk reveals that a professor he had consulted tells him that ‘in the old wooden houses on the back streets of Istanbul there were tens of thousands of manuscripts filled with stories of this kind’.

Faruk tells us that the manuscript we are about to read is his own rendition into contemporary Turkish. I suppose that to see everything as connected with everything else is the addiction of our time.

It is because I too have succumbed to this disease that I publish this tale. In between this dedication and Faruk’s Preface is a quotation allegedly from Marcel Proust with no reference as to where in Proust’s work this quotation is to be found but with the qualification ‘from the mistranslation of Y.

All this is in the beginning before the actual story itself We are obviously in some murky territory here Hoja becomes the Italian; the Italian becomes Hoja. By the way, is it just a ‘concidence’, or merely an example of seeing everything connected to everything else, that the name of the White castle is ‘Doppio’ the Italian word for ‘double’? It is really only in the final chapter Chapter eleven that one becomes embroiled in the complex literary trap that this novel really is, for it is here that the distinctions between the two men are, I believe, deliberately blurred, so that in the end one is no longer sure who is who.

Stories of ‘Hoja’ as the Italian are referred to; narratives by the Italian, which point out his ignorance of Italian cities are cited; ‘Hoja’ is referred to as He and Him with capital lettersand the sultan refers to Him as being the Italian captive while he is talking to the Italian believing him to be Hoja — or does he?

The narrator, whoever he is, also seems to think his Childhood memories, exchanged with Hoja earlier, are indeed his own. There are numerous puzzling associations and confusions in this final chapter, and they all resonate with the general undermining of the narrative provided in the Preface by ‘Faruk’.

A complex example is provided on page of my Faber paperback edition: Any attempt to unravel the unravellable is bound to frustration.